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OMRON WheezeScan

Best Practice Bulletin Edition 11 - Post Show

15 Nov 2021

OMRON WheezeScan

OMRON WheezeScan

Wheeze is the most common symptom of asthma in children under 5. The identification is important for the asthmatic symptom control in children and to prevent attacks, however 55% of parents identify wheeze differently than professionals because it does not always sound the same. WheezeScan provides an objective assessment of the presence of wheezing to manage children’s asthmatic symptoms at home.

55% of parents identify wheeze differently than professionals (5).

Wheezing is the symptomatic manifestation of any disease process which causes airway obstruction. It is a musical, high pitched, adventitious sound generated anywhere from the larynx to the distal bronchioles during either expiration or inspiration.

Wheeze is the most common symptom of asthma in children under 5, but it does not always sound the same (1). Furthermore, children are more likely to require urgent health care than asthma sufferers of any age (2). The identification of wheeze is important for the asthmatic symptom control in children and to prevent attacks (1,3). However, wheeze is a subjective sound and can be described in many ways (4). The conceptual understandings of the sound of wheeze for parents are different from epidemiology definitions (5). Moreover, poorly managed asthma can result in reduced quality of life for patients, a more regular need for healthcare resources, and substantial costs to public health services (4,6).

WheezeScan

Omron WheezeScanHelps you detect wheeze in children with asthma symptoms.

OMRON WheezeScan provides an objective assessment of the presence of wheezing. A convenient tool to help parents to manage their children’s asthmatic symptoms at home.

  • Innovative listening technology – identifies “wheeze” or “no wheeze” quickly and accurately.
  • Unique wheeze sensor – detects the presence of wheeze.
  • Quick measurement – result in 30 seconds.
  • Especially developed for children – from 4 months to 7 years old.
  • OMRON Asthma Diary app – manage and track results with your smart device. Allows to log wheeze episodes, symptoms and triggers that can be shared with the child’s doctor to help manage patient care.


 

OMRON Academy module on wheezing: CLICK HERE

More information about WheezeScan: CLICK HERE

More information about the condition wheezing: CLICK HERE

CLICK HERE Click here to download the WheezeScan ePaper by Dr. Sarah Jarvis MBE 'Identifying Asthmatic Symptoms in Very Young Children', published by OMRON Healthcare Europe in December 2020.

CLICK HERE to download the latest publication about the impact of a digital wheeze detector on parental disease management of pre-school children suffering from wheezing.

 

ABOUT OMRON HEALTHCARE Committed to helping people live a freer and more fulfilling life with zero compromise, OMRON Healthcare is a global leader in the field of clinically proven, innovative medical equipment for health monitoring and therapy making OMRON Healthcare the Global No.1 brand in both digital blood pressure monitors as well as nebulizers for respiratory treatment.

 

1 Ng, Mark Chung Wai, and Choon How How. “Recurrent wheeze and cough in young children: is it asthma?.” Singapore medical journal 55.5 (2014): 236.
2 Moorman, Jeanne E., et al. “National surveillance of asthma: United States, 2001-2010.” Vital & health statistics. Series 3, Analytical and epidemiological studies 35 (2012): 1-58.
3 Patel, Pujan H., Vincent S. Mirabile, and Sandeep Sharma. “Wheezing.” StatPearls [Internet] (2020).
4 Gong, Henry. “Wheezing and asthma.” Clinical Methods: The History, Physical, and Laboratory Examinations. 3rd edition (1990).
5 Cane, R. S., S. C. Ranganathan, and S. A. McKenzie. “What do parents of wheezy children understand by “wheeze”?.” Archives of disease in childhood 82.4 (2000): 327-332.
6 Caminati, Marco et al. “Uncontrolled Asthma: Unmet Needs in the Management of Patients.” Journal of asthma and allergy vol. 14 457-466. 3 May. 2021

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